The system of economic deprivation: look closer and see how far down the bottom goes

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Ending poverty is a modern idea, not widely documented in pre-modern times. Intended to relieve poverty in the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson introduced in the 1960s, the war on poverty by extending social welfare legislation. The program, known as the Great Society, was part of a more extensive legislative reform that Johnson wished would make the United States a more fair and just country. Johnson stated, “Our aim is not only to relieve the symptom of poverty, but to cure it and, above all, to prevent it.”

I carry some residue of having grown up poor

My childhood affects me every day in ways most people may struggle…


Can we change direction, and if so, how?

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“No matter how bad things get, you have to go on living, even if it kills you,” said Sholom Aleichem. (His name means “[May] peace [be] upon you!”)

Tomorrow, you stand there, staring at me with desperate, wild eyes when I ask you: How do I evaluate the nebulous question of whether our civilization is moving toward a cliff? The weight of the question, the vastness of it, hangs over me, heavy and penetrating as the fog. …


Committing to memory the military heroes who died by suicide

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Photo from Pixabay / Johnjain / workshopped

Suicide, I believe that no man ever threw away life while it was worth keeping,” David Hume (1711–1776) the Scottish philosopher wrote in an essay.

Throughout history, suicide has evoked a wide range of reactions — bafflement, dismissal, heroic glorification, sympathy, anger, moral or religious condemnation — suicide is controversial. To this day, suicide carries a negative subtext in all Judeo-Christian cultures. Only in so-called pagan cultures such as the Japanese samurai society, the ancient Romans, and Greeks would suicide be a tolerable or even noble act.

A great deal of the philosophical…


Committing to memory the military heroes who died by suicide

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“Suicide, I believe that no man ever threw away life while it was worth keeping,” David Hume (1711–1776) the Scottish philosopher wrote in an essay.

Throughout history, suicide has evoked a wide range of reactions — bafflement, dismissal, heroic glorification, sympathy, anger, moral or religious condemnation — suicide is controversial. To this day, suicide carries a negative subtext in all Judeo-Christian cultures. Only in so-called pagan cultures such as the Japanese samurai society, the ancient Romans, and Greeks would suicide be a tolerable or even noble act.

A great deal of the philosophical writing surrounding suicide is concerned with the…


The speed of present breakthroughs has no historical model

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We stand on the brim of a technological revolution that will alter how we live, work, and relate to one another. In its complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before. The pace of present breakthroughs has no historical model.

Although technology has its benefits, some of us escape into the nostalgic world of old movies. In a forward-looking culture, fixated with the newest innovation, why get interested in bygone days? They offer escapism to a simpler time full of predictability and endings that leave your heart satisfied. It could be because we are fast-tracking too rapidly…


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“More than machinery, we need humanity. More than cleverness, we need kindness and gentleness.” — CHARLIE CHAPLIN

As the nation is fully engaged in the politics of the moment, with tension running high in various quarters, it is essential to step back and reflect on the goals of democracy.

And few people have succeeded in succinctly expounding on the core tenets of democracy better than Charlie Chaplin.

In “The Great Dictator,” Chaplin stars in two roles, the dictator of Tomania — based explicitly on Adolf Hitler, spewing hate speeches in mock German.

At times, he roars his anger and desires…


My definition is simply two consenting adults exchanging sex for cash

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I’ve been compelled to continue to write about sex workers after receiving some strong responses from several of my friends after they read “Hidden in Plain Sight.”

A common response was something like “That’s disgusting. How could anybody sell themselves?” A friend who has committed to fighting human trafficking wrote that “Women engaging in commercial sex almost uniformly have a history of childhood sexual trauma, molestation, or rape. Poverty, dysfunctional family situations, and other social-economic forces are at play as well and combine to create the fertile ground for this “choice,” which is therefore not a choice.”

Some other women…


Modern-day slavery is much closer than you think

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According to Anti-Slavery International, “A person today is considered enslaved if they are forced to work against their will; are owned or controlled by an exploiter or “employer”; have limited freedom of movement; or are dehumanized, treated as a commodity or bought and sold as property.”

Modern-day slavery

Modern slavery is one of the themes in my novel which is currently in progress. This theme is present because it is a matter of concern to me as a writer and a citizen. And because words matter, for this article I will be using the word slaves instead of prostitution. Slavery can be…


It’s human nature to want to oversimplify, but I think I missed the cues

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We are hardwired to connect with others. It adds meaning to our lives. But no one tells you that your serenity and peace of mind are all about to be taken away from you, with no sign that you’re standing on the precipice. A sucker punch that originates out of nowhere.

A few days ago, my former friend took that concept to another level. She not only breached boundaries, but she also broke and mutilated them.

The frequent visit, the drinking, the breached boundaries.

Our friendship ignited quickly. Yesterday, I stanched that fire. There were red flags, all right, ones I chose to ignore.

Carol (name changed) is…


Plot twists, detailed narratives, complications, and moral lessons

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There is value to reading thrillers and other types of suspense fiction. They provide a mental workout. As a bonus, when tension-filled stories make your heart race faster, and your neck muscles tighten — you are expelling stress. Maybe, just maybe, reading thrillers with a strong message help remind you how important it is that we sometimes put aside our interests for the improvement of others.

Last night, my husband and I watched Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, which reminded me why I like to write psychological thrillers. Rear Window takes place through the eyes of a photographer gazing out of…

Henya Drescher

Psychological thrillers writer, weightlifter. Stolen Truth soon to be published. https://henyadrescher.com https://medium.com/@henyadrescher

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